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Archived Avalanche Advisories from the Mount Shasta Avalanche Center

Use this page to view archived advisories. The table below shows the overall danger rating and the bottom line for the 20 most recent advisories. Click on the time and date link above each danger rating icon to view the full advisory for that day. Use the date chooser or the pager at the bottom to scroll through the older advisories.

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Date the advisory was published: Bottom Line
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April 6, 2013 at 6:44 am

A low chance of human triggered wind slabs exists today. Very isolated wind slabs will exist near and above treeline. Mid-elevation, S, SE, E, NE aspects and complex/extreme terrain will be the best place to find these slabs. Periods of recent snowfall with moderate to high west winds on the mountain have created these slabs. On the upper mountain, it's likely most of the snow has blown away and the snowpack has been scoured down to firm, icy snow. Slabs could be 6-12 inches deep.Cooling temperatures and increased cloud cover has decreased the chance of any loose-wet avalanches today . Further cooling will occur for the rest of the weekend and will help refreeze our current snowpack. Any warming related instabilities will be limited to roller balls, pin wheels and small, isolated point releases. If and when temperatures do begin to warm in the future, loose-wet instabilities will become a concern again.

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April 5, 2013 at 6:37 am

Loose-wet snow avalanches will be one's main concern for today and this weekend. Recent warm temperatures and rain on snow could allow for more loose-wet snow instabilities in the form of roller balls, point releases and potentially larger wet snow sloughs. Slopes steeper than 35 degrees from 6,000 to 11,500 feet, all aspects, will be most prone to these instabilities.

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March 31, 2013 at 6:54 am

The avalanche danger today is low with pockets of moderate.Timing of the storm this weekend has been slowed, however significant precipitation in the form of rain and snow is expected. Elevations below 8,000 feet will see mostly rain and/or wet snow. On the upper mountain, one or more feet of new snow is possible. Any instability due to rain will likely be seen within the first few hours of precipitation and/or during the warmest portions of the day. Storm slabs and wind slabs will be most sensitive to trigger today and tomorrow as new snow accumulates on the upper mountain.  Tuesday and Wednesday, temperatures are expected to be 10F degrees above normal. Wet-loose activity will still be our primary concern. Wind/Storm slabs could also linger on the upper mountain in isolated areas. Climbers be aware and carry a beacon, shovel and probe!

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March 30, 2013 at 6:51 am

The avalanche danger today is low for all aspects and elevations. We currently sit in the calm before the storm... Significant precipitation in the form of rain and snow will develop over the forecast area later today, tonight and Sunday. Elevations below 10,000 feet will see mostly rain on snow. On the upper mountain, one to two feet of new snow is possible. Avalanche conditions are currently low this morning but are expected to rise as the storm moves through. Any instability due to rain will likely be seen within the first few hours of precip. Storm slab and wind slabs will be most suspect on Sunday. Climbers should use extra caution this weekend and be sure to carry a beacon, shovel and probe!

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March 29, 2013 at 6:46 am

The avalanche danger today is low for all aspects and elevations. The forecast area has received 1" - 4" of wet snow (.28" water) at elevations above 6,500 feet in the past 48 hours with little wind. Temperatures today will be warm with a high near 50 F near treeline. A chance of scattered rain showers is possilbe in the afternoon. Conditions are WET and are going to continue to be wet through the weekend.  A storm will let loose over the area on Saturday and Sunday bringing significant precipitation. We could see up to .5" of rain and snow levels at 7,500 to 10,000 feet. Loose-Wet Avalanches are going to be the main concern for the next few days and the avalanche danger will likely rise as this storm develops on Saturday.

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March 24, 2013 at 6:25 am

The avalanche danger today is low for all aspects and elevations. This past Tuesday and Wednesday we had a warm storm drop about 4"-8" inches of snow to elevations above 6,500 ft and rain below. Following that, northwest winds howled stripping most if not all of the available new snow away. Conditions are firm and stable over the forecast area though there could be areas of small wind slabs snow in isolated areas near rock outcrops, chutes, gullies and wind eddies. Remember that low avalanche danger means that avalanches are still possible! Normal caution advised.

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March 23, 2013 at 6:18 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. This past week we received a warm storm that brought 4"-8" inches of snow to elevations above 6,500 ft and rain below that. Yesterday, northwest winds howled on the mountain for the majority of the day and any snow available for transport probably got blown away! The main concern for today will be areas of wind deposited snow in isolated areas near rock outcrops, chutes, gullies and wind eddies. Wind slabs will be small, hard to find and likely of no consequence if triggered. Remember that low avalanche danger means that avalanches are still possible!

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March 22, 2013 at 7:09 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. This past week we received a warm storm that brought 4"-8" inches of snow to elevations above 6,500 ft. Snow levels fluctuated and most of the snowpack below 6,500 feet took a hit from rain on snow. Overall, the recent storm snow was wet and deposited itself in a very cohesive manner on the mountain. The North winds blew yesterday on the upper mountain at a steady 20-30 mph with gusts higher. This morning, winds out of the north have increased and currently Gray Butte is showing average wind speeds of 40-50 mph with gusts to 78 mph. Most of the new snow is well pasted on the old snowpack or has simply blown away. That being said, one's primary concern for today should be for freshly formed wind slabs in isolated areas, below and above treeline, all aspects.

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March 17, 2013 at 6:38 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. Our current snowpack sits in a state of transition from the varying temperatures over the past week. Cooler days recently have decreased the chance of the loose-wet avalanche potential. Small wind slabs are isolated to the mid and upper elevations of the mountain and will be difficult to trigger. A few cornices in the Castle Lake area along Middle Peak are present and could become weak during the warm portions of the day. While conditions are overall stable, low avalanche danger means avalanches are still possible.

 

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March 16, 2013 at 6:44 am

The avalanche danger for today is low for all aspects and elevations. We've seen a general cooling trend over the last two days and temperatures will remain similar to yesterday. All aspects below 8,000 feet will host soft, sticky snow with a low potential for loose-wet sloughs. Snow on slopes near and above treeline is making a transition to melt/freeze corn...supportable, however not fully mature... Mid elevation wet-loose activity has been low. Upper elevations will host wind packed powder and some small wind slabs in isolated areas with low potential to trigger.

 

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March 15, 2013 at 6:55 am

Warm temperatures during the day and above freezing lows at night has kept the new snow we received last week very soft with the potential of wet, loose avalanche activity today. Slopes that are southerly facing and steeper than 35 degrees will be most prone to wet, loose instability during the warmest portions of the day. Temperatures today will be slightly cooler than yesterday and thus any instability will likely be limited to the Castle Lake area and elevations below 7,000 feet.

 

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March 10, 2013 at 7:05 am

For today, the overall avalanche danger is LOW with pockets of   MODERATE in upper elevation wind loaded slopes with a North and Northeasterly aspect. The new snow has bonded well to the old snow and no avalanche activity has been observed or reported.

 

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March 9, 2013 at 6:57 am

For today, the avalanche danger is LOW for low and mid elevations and  MODERATE on the upper elevations. The new snow has bonded well to the old snow and no avalanche activity has been observed or reported.

 

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March 8, 2013 at 7:04 am

For today, the avalanche danger remains LOW for lower aspects and elevations and  MODERATE on the mid and upper elevations.. The existing snowpack looks to be handleing the new snow well but with the accompanying winds we should expect some wind slabs, storm slabs, and crossloading. Weak interfaces have been observed in the new storm where slight density changes exist but overall the storm snow is bonding well to the old snow surface.

 

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March 7, 2013 at 7:18 am

For today, the avalanche danger remains LOW for lower aspects and elevations and has increased to MODERATE on the mid and upper elevations. Our storm totals are approaching 2 feet in the deepest places heightening our avalanche conditions and making human triggered avalanches possible. The existing snowpack looks to be handleing the new snow well but with the accompanying winds we should expect some wind slabs, storm slabs, and crossloading. Yesterday weak interfaces were observed in the new storm snow 30-35 cm below the surface. They didn't have much energy or a high quality shear but were failing easliy with comprssion tests (ct4&5, Q2).

 

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March 3, 2013 at 7:00 am

For today, the overall avalanche danger remains LOW for all aspects and elevations. We received a trace of new snow over the past 12 hours with light to moderate NW winds. Instabilities are unlikely today. Most other areas have been scoured down to the old, firm snow surface and/or entered a melt/freeze cycle. Normal caution advised.

We are expecting the avalanche danger to rise on late Tuesday and Wednesday, 3-5 and 3-6. Up to 1" inch of water and moderate to strong Southwest winds are expected for this storm. This could mean several inches of snow in town and more above 6,000 feet. A firm snowpack in place will provide a great bed surface for this new snow to potentially slide on. Stay tuned for potential advisory updates as the week progresses.

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March 2, 2013 at 6:59 am

For today, the overall avalanche danger remains LOW for all aspects and elevations. We received no new snow over this past week with predominantly moderate northwest winds. Instabilities are unlikely and will be limited to areas of wind loading near ridgetops, bowls, rock outcrops, chutes and gullies on all aspects and on slopes steeper than 35 degrees. Most other areas have been scoured down to the old, firm snow surface and/or entered a melt/freeze cycle. Normal caution advised.

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March 1, 2013 at 6:55 am

For today, the overall avalanche danger remains LOW. We received no new snow over this past week with predominantly moderate northwest winds. Instabilities are unlikely and will be limited to areas of wind loading near ridgetops, bowls, rock outcrops, chutes and gullies on all aspects and on slopes steeper than 35 degrees.  Most other areas have been scoured down to the old, firm snow surface and/or entered a melt/freeze cycle.

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February 24, 2013 at 7:15 am

For today, the overall avalanche danger remains LOW with pockets of MODERATE danger where wind slabs are present. We received 5-7 inches of new snow over this past week with moderate to strong winds from various directions. Instabilities will be limited to areas of wind loading near ridgetops, bowls, rock outcrops, chutes and gullies. Winds have primarily blown from the northwest, however periods of wind from other directions have occurred. Be cautious of wind slabs on all aspects and on slopes steeper than 35 degrees.  Most other areas have been scoured down to the old, firm snow surface.

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February 23, 2013 at 7:03 am

A variety of snow conditions exist today in the forecast area. Overall low with pockets of moderate avalanche danger. We received 4-6 inches of new snow over the week with strong winds from various directions.We received up to an inch in the last 24 hours. While some areas have been scoured down to old snow surface by winds in the past several days, instabilities will be found in isolated wind loaded areas near ridgetops, bowls, rock outcrops, chutes and gullies.

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