Avalanche Advisory published on August 23, 2014: Issued by Nick Meyers at 10:58am
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Pray for SNOW!

We are looking forward to the 2014 - 2015 season. Avalanche advisories will begin in December.

GET EDUCATED! Our FREE Avalanche Awareness and Companion Rescue clinics will continue this season as well as our snowmobile specific avalanche awareness/companion rescue workshops! Stay tuned for dates. 

Watch out for rockfall and always wear a helment when climbing Mt Shasta. It's recommended that one wait until next season to climb Shasta. Check out the Climbing Advisory for current climbing information.

 




danger scale: 1. Low 2. Moderate 3. Considerable 4. High 5. Extreme

avalanche danger

None

Above treeline

None

Near treeline

None

Below treeline

Pray for SNOW!

We are looking forward to the 2014 - 2015 season. Avalanche advisories will begin in December.

GET EDUCATED! Our FREE Avalanche Awareness and Companion Rescue clinics will continue this season as well as our snowmobile specific avalanche awareness/companion rescue workshops! Stay tuned for dates. 

Watch out for rockfall and always wear a helment when climbing Mt Shasta. It's recommended that one wait until next season to climb Shasta. Check out the Climbing Advisory for current climbing information.

 

danger scale: 1. Low 2. Moderate 3. Considerable 4. High 5. Extreme

recent observations

The Mt Shasta Avalanche Center has shut it's doors for the season. Thanks for all your support. Be sure to check the Climbing Advisory if venturing onto Mt Shasta this Summer and Fall.

Avalanche Advisories will begin in December. Stay tuned for avalanche education and event dates!

Terrain:  Remember most of the terrain that we like to play on is greater than 30 degrees.  Avalanches are possible on anything steeper than 30 degrees.  Avoid cornices, rock bands, terrain traps and runout zones of avalanche paths.

Weather:  Most of our areas avalanche danger will occur 24-48 hours after a storm. We still can see persistent weak layers from time to time and we always will be sure to let you know about that!  Heed the basic signs: Wind (significant snow transport and depositions), Temperature (rain/snow/rain/snow, which in turn weakens the snowpack), and Precipitation (Snow or rain add weight and stress to the current snowpack).

SnowpackIf snow accumulates, give the snowpack a chance to adjust to the new snow load before you play on or near steep slopes (greater than 30 degrees).  Most direct action avalanches occur within 24-48 hours of recent snowfall.  Watch for obvious signs of snowpack instability such as recent natural avalanche activity, collapsing of the snowpack (often associated with a “whumphing” sound), and shooting cracks. If you see these signs of instability, limit your recreation to lower angle slopes.

Human Factor: Don’t forget to carry and know how to use avalanche rescue gear. You should NOT be skiing or climbing potential avalanche slopes without having beacons, shovels, and probes.  Only one person in a group should be exposed to potential avalanche danger at a time.  Remember, climbing, skiing, and riding down the edge of slopes is safer than being in the center.  Just because another person is on a slope doesn’t mean that it is safe.  Be an individual!  Make your own decisions.  Heed the signs of instability: rapid warming, “whumphing” noises, shooting cracks, snowing an inch an hour or more, rain, roller balls, wind loading, recent avalanche activity.

The Five Red Flags of Avalanche Danger any time of year include:  1) Recent/current avalanche activity  2) Whumpfing sounds or shooting cracks  3) Recent/current heavy snowfall  4) Strong winds transporting snow  5) Rapid warming or rain on snow.

 


 

CURRENT CONDITIONS AT BUNNY FLAT
0600 temperature: deg. F.
Max. temperature in the last 24 hours: deg. F.
Average wind direction during the last 24 hours:
Average wind speed during the last 24 hours: mph
Maximum wind gust in the last 24 hours: mph
New snowfall in the last 24 hours: inches
Total snow depth: inches
weather

FOR CURRENT WEATHER STATION INFORMATION, MOUSE OVER, [ 'WEATHER' > 'REMOTE WEATHER STATIONS' ] ON OUR WEBPAGE AND CHOOSE ACCORDINGLY!

On Mt Shasta (South Side) in the last 24 hours...

Old Ski Bowl - 7,600 feet

Gray Butte - 8,000 feet

Castle Lake and Mt Eddy (West side of I-5)... 

Castle Lake - 5,600 feet

Mt Eddy - 6,500 feet

THIS SEASON: 4-14-14  Since September 1st , we have received 13.79 inches of water, normal is 37.93 inches, putting us at 36% of normal. For the year of 2014, Mt Shasta has received 10.97 inches of water with normal being 22.05 inches which puts us at 49% of normal. And lastly, for April we sit at 31% of normal, receiving .56 inches of water, normal is 1.80 inches.

Always check the weather before you attempt to climb Mt Shasta. Further, monitor the weather as you climb. Becoming caught on the mountain in any type of weather can compromise life and limb. It is not uncommon for late season storms to arrive and create winter conditions on Shasta.  Be prepared.

Two-Day Mountain Weather Forecast Published On August 23, 2014
FOR 6000-8000 ft. Sat Aug 23rd Sat Night Aug 23rd Sun Aug 24th
Weather: Clea
Temperatures: deg. F. deg. F. deg. F.
Wind direction:
Wind speed:
Expected snowfall: in. in. in.

FOR 8000-10000 ft. Sat Aug 23rd Sat Night Aug 23rd Sun Aug 24th
Weather:
Temperatures: deg. F. deg. F. deg. F.
Wind direction:
Wind speed:
Expected snowfall: in. in. in.
disclaimer
This advisory does not apply to Ski Areas or Highways and is for the Mt. Shasta, Castle Lake and Mt. Eddy back country. Use this information for guidance only. You may find different conditions in the back country and should travel accordingly. This advisory expires at Midnight August 23, 2014.
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