General Route Description: 

The Clear Creek route is Mt. Shasta’s easiest route to the top.  That being said, “Casual day syndrome” can lead one off course and into steeper, glaciated, and/or rock fall prone terrain.  The climb starts at the Clear Creek trail head beneath towering old growth Red Fir.  The hike gains elevation along the ridge above the cavernous Mud Creek Canyon. Some fault the route for its loose ash, scree and gravel surface during the summer and fall. We consider it reason to take your time, and to enjoy the scenery and geology. As you climb, you'll enjoy views of the Konwakiton Glacier and Mud Creek Canyon, Wintun Glacier and a huge expanse of California. Ample camping options and spring water are available at 8,600 feet.  Please camp at least 200 feet from the spring head and creek and do not step on the fragile plant ecosystem. The beautiful foliage only has a short season to do its thing!  The lower 75% of the route is a moderate hike.  The last portion of the route turns into easy climbing.  A rock bulge blocks the ride top and encourages the climber to traverse up and to the right, skirting along the top of the southern corner of the Wintun snowfield.   This route offers fantastic views of Mt. Lassen, Konwonkiton Glacier, Mud Creek Canyon, and the Wintun Glacier.  It’s a long climb, so start early. It may not test your technical skills, but it will test your stamina.  Those of strong mind and body can do the Clear Creek route in a day, but most should plan a delightful two, or even three day trip.

Route Map: 
Trailhead: 
Summer Conditions Photo: 
Winter Conditions Photo: 

Current Route Conditions

08-22-2017-Clear Creek

Conditions update by: Climbing Ranger Nick Meyers Shasta-Trinity National Forest

This trailhead is OPEN and the road is clear of debris. Summit passes, wilderness permits, and packout bags are available and the bathrooms are open. No water is available at any of the trailheads.

The route is in good shape and mostly free of snow. Dirt from Mud Creek Canyon often blows up onto the snow, exacerbating snowmelt. The crux of climbing this route in good conditions is the approach. Low angle terrain comprises most of this route. Still, ice axe, crampons, a helmet, and a beacon, shovel and probe are strongly advised. Check the weather, know the route, and be prepared.